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How to use a GPS receiver for training

GPS tracking devices GPS trackers for cars Portable GPS trackers

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#1 Guest_Jimi electronic_*

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 03:03 AM

GPS receiver not only helps you successfully get between Point A and Point B but is also handy for staying found. These tips apply to almost any sport:

 

  • Measure distances over known courses: Instead of guessing the course or route length, you can use a GPS receiver to measure the distance with a fair amount of accuracy.

 

  • Better understand the elevation of courses: Elevation data can give you a more accurate sense of how flat or hilly a course really is. Even if your GPS receiver doesn’t have a barometric altimeter (which is required for more precise altitude measurement), the elevation data associated with recorded tracks gives you a ballpark idea of how steep a course is.

 

  • Better understand speed: Your GPS receiver has a trip computer that provides information about your maximum, minimum, and average speed. By analyzing track data, you can measure your speed over individual sections of a course.

 

  • Discover new courses: Uploading recorded tracks to an aerial photo or topographic map shows you where you’ve been and can also reveal nearby roads or trails that you didn’t know about.

 

Your GPS receiver can play a few roles as an electronic training partner:

 

  • Data logger: In this mode, the GPS receiver records data that you process when you get back home. You download the data to your PC and a program that analyzes the track log. While you’re working out, you never really look at the GPS receiver (unless you get lost, of course).

 

1-140R0040442-300x203.jpg

You can use any general purpose GPS receiver as a data logger. I think most people tend to like the Garmin Geko series because they’re small, lightweight, inexpensive (the 201 model is under $140) and easy to carry. (Avoid the Geko 101 because it can’t interface to a computer, which means you can’t analyze track logs.) When you’re logging data, follow these rules:

 

  • Lock sufficient satellites: Always make sure your GPS receiver has a lock on at least four satellites (the minimum you need for a good 3-D fix) before you start your workout.

 

  • Start clean: Before you start, clear the active track log. When you’re finished working out, immediately turn off the GPS receiver.

 

Always download the active log to your computer first before saving it in the GPS receiver. Some GPS receivers remove the track date and time data or compress the number of tracks when you save a track log.

 

  • Coach: In this mode, you use the GPS receiver to give you immediate feedback while you’re working out. It’s still logging track data, but you’re looking at the screen, checking your speed, distance, and time. Several GPS receivers on the market are specifically designed to perform as a workout coach; I discuss these models in this chapter.

 

Don’t use your GPS receiver’s battery saver mode if you’re using your GPS receiver to record tracks while you’re working out. The accuracy of your tracks will be diminished because satellite data is received less often. Use rechargeable batteries instead.

 

Aside from a GPS receiver and a cable to download the collected data to a computer, you also need software so you can analyze your performance based on the tracks that have been recorded.

 

Some possibilities include

 

  • Endless Pursuit (endlesspursuit.com)This Web-hosted, work-out-logging product is designed specifically for athletes.

 

  • TopoFusion (topofusion.com)Although this mapping program wasn’t designed primarily to log workouts, its authors include features so an athlete better understands his or her performance over a set course by analyzing track data, including moving, stopped, uphill, down-hill, and flat time; up/down/flat distance; average uphill/downhill grade; and maximum speed. A recent beta version of the program included an athlete’s logbook and difficulty-and-effort indices for record tracks. This program, reasonably priced at $40, is turning into one of my favorite logging tools.

 

  • GPS utility programs: Two shareware programs — GPS Utility ( gpsu.co.uk) and GARtrip (www.gartrip.de) — are general-purpose GPS tools but have features for analyzing track logs. Both programs have features that examine distance, speed, and time data. Registered versions are available for under $50.

 

  • Spreadsheets: Because track data can be exported into comma- or tab-delimited text files, if you know your way around a spread-sheet program such as Microsoft Excel, it’s pretty easy to write your own formulas and macros to analyze the data that you collect.

More information at www.jimilab.com. Should you have other questions, please contact us at info@jimilab.com.

GPS receiver not only helps you successfully get between Point A and Point B but is also handy for staying found. These tips apply to almost any sport:

 

  • Measure distances over known courses: Instead of guessing the course or route length, you can use a GPS receiver to measure the distance with a fair amount of accuracy.

 

  • Better understand the elevation of courses: Elevation data can give you a more accurate sense of how flat or hilly a course really is. Even if your GPS receiver doesn’t have a barometric altimeter (which is required for more precise altitude measurement), the elevation data associated with recorded tracks gives you a ballpark idea of how steep a course is.

 

  • Better understand speed: Your GPS receiver has a trip computer that provides information about your maximum, minimum, and average speed. By analyzing track data, you can measure your speed over individual sections of a course.

 

  • Discover new courses: Uploading recorded tracks to an aerial photo or topographic map shows you where you’ve been and can also reveal nearby roads or trails that you didn’t know about.

 

Your GPS receiver can play a few roles as an electronic training partner:

 

  • Data logger: In this mode, the GPS receiver records data that you process when you get back home. You download the data to your PC and a program that analyzes the track log. While you’re working out, you never really look at the GPS receiver (unless you get lost, of course).

 

1-140R0040442-300x203.jpg

You can use any general purpose GPS receiver as a data logger. I think most people tend to like the Garmin Geko series because they’re small, lightweight, inexpensive (the 201 model is under $140) and easy to carry. (Avoid the Geko 101 because it can’t interface to a computer, which means you can’t analyze track logs.) When you’re logging data, follow these rules:

 

  • Lock sufficient satellites: Always make sure your GPS receiver has a lock on at least four satellites (the minimum you need for a good 3-D fix) before you start your workout.

 

  • Start clean: Before you start, clear the active track log. When you’re finished working out, immediately turn off the GPS receiver.

 

Always download the active log to your computer first before saving it in the GPS receiver. Some GPS receivers remove the track date and time data or compress the number of tracks when you save a track log.

 

  • Coach: In this mode, you use the GPS receiver to give you immediate feedback while you’re working out. It’s still logging track data, but you’re looking at the screen, checking your speed, distance, and time. Several GPS receivers on the market are specifically designed to perform as a workout coach; I discuss these models in this chapter.

 

Don’t use your GPS receiver’s battery saver mode if you’re using your GPS receiver to record tracks while you’re working out. The accuracy of your tracks will be diminished because satellite data is received less often. Use rechargeable batteries instead.

 

Aside from a GPS receiver and a cable to download the collected data to a computer, you also need software so you can analyze your performance based on the tracks that have been recorded.

 

Some possibilities include

 

  • Endless Pursuit (endlesspursuit.com)This Web-hosted, work-out-logging product is designed specifically for athletes.

 

  • TopoFusion (topofusion.com)Although this mapping program wasn’t designed primarily to log workouts, its authors include features so an athlete better understands his or her performance over a set course by analyzing track data, including moving, stopped, uphill, down-hill, and flat time; up/down/flat distance; average uphill/downhill grade; and maximum speed. A recent beta version of the program included an athlete’s logbook and difficulty-and-effort indices for record tracks. This program, reasonably priced at $40, is turning into one of my favorite logging tools.

 

  • GPS utility programs: Two shareware programs — GPS Utility ( gpsu.co.uk) and GARtrip (www.gartrip.de) — are general-purpose GPS tools but have features for analyzing track logs. Both programs have features that examine distance, speed, and time data. Registered versions are available for under $50.

 

  • Spreadsheets: Because track data can be exported into comma- or tab-delimited text files, if you know your way around a spread-sheet program such as Microsoft Excel, it’s pretty easy to write your own formulas and macros to analyze the data that you collect.
  •  


#2 Guest_Andrewtub_*

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Posted 22 November 2016 - 03:36 AM

I only use it on the track. I never used it before I got my combo ecu/dsg tune because it seemed useless but after the tunes it is fantastic. Mainly the DSG tune because it shifts exactly how I would or better now.

#3 Guest_Jamesdix_*

Guest_Jamesdix_*
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Posted 22 May 2017 - 11:30 AM

Hi All, I have just started to use FAR..Can anyone tell me how to use FAR... or any manual or Help in english





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